Saturday, 28 October 2017

THE UNRIVALLED TRANSCENDENCE OF WILLEM J GYLE by J D Dixon @James_D_Dixon


5 out of 5 stars

On Amazon UK
On Amazon.com
On Goodreads


How I discovered this book:  it was submitted to Rosie Amber's Book Review Team, of which I am a member. 

Genre: Literary, psychological, contemporary drama. 

What a find.  This book is seriously good.  I mean, seriously.  I'd recommend it to anyone, whatever your usual genres of choice. 

Willem J Gyle is a bit slow.  But he gets by.  He lives with his mother, who takes care of all his needs, including finding him a job on a construction site which suits his size and strength, and where he makes friends.  He loves his mam, his dog, and the football on the telly.  Then, in just a few days, his world comes crashing down, and Willem finds himself homeless.  Having neither verbal skill nor knowledge of how 'the system' works, he is unable to find anyone to help him, and drifts into a life on the streets and, inevitably, crime.  Much to my surprise, his darker side comes to the fore, but is this innate psychopathy, anger at the world, an expression of pain for all he has lost, or just a primal instinct for survival?  I thought it was a combination of all those elements.

Winding up in a community of other homeless people, which he considers, at first, to be 'no more perfect place ... outside the law, above the law', he soon finds out that it's a reflection of the 'real' world, corrupt, with the weaker members suffering.  And on he walks....

Although the blurb appealed to me, I was dubious at first; the book starts off well-written but whimsical, which, coupled with the too-long and pretentious title, made me wonder if it would be slow-going.  But four pages in I was completely hooked, and stayed that way until the end.  J D Dixon has a real gift, the innate sort that cannot be learned from classes, 'how to write' books, blog posts, or anything else.  To me, writing talent is all about being able to create characters and worlds that absorb the reader completely, needing no wordy description, and JDD has this in spades.  He writes in a spare fashion, which I like.  He doesn't explain, or over-emphasise.  

The book is raw, rough in places, and sometimes shocking.  It's also immensely sad.  It's just - great.  One of the best debut novels I've ever read.



7 comments:

  1. Great review. I featured the author on my blog but had to turn down reviewing due to time. Will definitely be putting this on my tbr list now!

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    1. Oh Abbie, do - I read the interview with him. You will LOVE this!

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  2. This is what I love about book reviewing, taking a chance on an unknown book or author and finding a gem of a book. Terrific review.

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    1. Yes! Me too. It's how I discovered, say, William Savage and Liza Perrat. This guy just joined the list.

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  3. Gosh, I completely missed this one. Great review, Terry

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    1. I insist you request it, Judith, it's right up your street. I think you'll find the eponymous hero so interesting, particularly in relation to your Bill Howarth creation.

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    2. Lilyn from SciFi and Scary commented that she wouldn't have chosen this book but this review had made her interested in it - unfortunately, I deleted the comment by mistake.

      My answer is thus: Lilyn, twice I have chosen books from the review team list after reading reviews of yours, and twice I have been pleased I did (Phaethon and Chimera Catalyst), so maybe we have similar tastes? I do think you would love this guy's writing style, and it has a nihilistic quality that I think you'd like.

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